Tools

Open Access Publishing at TUHH: Exemplary Step-by-step guide for a toolchain with TORE, GitLab, Sherpa Romeo and Zenodo

The following step-by-step guide is updated regularly and should be seen as a kind of living document. A more recent version, if available, can be viewed via the repository linked in the license note at the end of the post.

Publishing a paper as preprint would work as described in the following steps:

  1. You have to get an overview on possibilities to publish and open access sharing rights (further information on the websites of the TU library)
  2. Check the permissions of your journal or publisher where you would like to publish via Sherpa Romeo. Example for IEEE proceeding is:
Example for aggregated permissions of IEEE proceedings via Sherpa Romeo

Here you can see that preprints (research papers that are shared before peer review) are possible and which rules you have to follow. For example for CDC (Conference on Decision and Control) you can upload the preprint with a notice that this paper is submitted for review and afterwards you have to place a copyright notice and a DOI link of the IEEE finally published version. You are not allowed to publish the final version, just an author version with the copyright terms. See IEEE policy, section 3 for that.

  1. Create a repository for your publication in our gitlab instance: TUHH – Gitlab (private repo, a public repo can be seen here). In general you create

    • a repository for your paper
    • a repository for your software code (See Code Section)

Use the following scheme: Year-paper-conference-FirstSixWordsOfTitleOfYourPublication (e.g. 2021-paper-ECC-A-Gradient-Descent-Method-for-Finite) while the code is in the corresponding Year-code-TitleOfYourContribution repository.

  1. Have in mind to add references to supplimentary material in the readme.
  2. Add submission or copyright terms to your paper and create a prefinal pdf. You might keep some space (Where??) to place the preprint DOI for references.
  3. Open tore submission page with your personal account (more details via tore help).
  4. Select Publications with fulltext and click on manual submission
  5. The next pages collect metadata:
    • Title
    • Authors (Add an ORCID if possible, Add Prof Werner, for example). Clicking on the magnifier allows searching for entries. Validated entries are marked with a green arrow.
    • Select Language: English
    • Type: Preprint
    • Enter Abstract in English
    • Select TUHH Institute: Type E14 and by using the magnifier select the validated entry.
    • Go next
A click on the magnifier allows searching for entries
  1. Next page collects publisher metadata:
    • These information will be updated with the final version to be submitted for publication
    • Enter Date of issue: Todays date
    • Go next
  2. License details
    • License: Copyright should be selected
    • Supplemented by: Here you can add your Code DOI
    • Project: If you are working for a DFG program, you should reference it here
    • Funder: Here you should add DFG or BMWI as Funder
  3. Now you get your DOI.
    • Copy this DOI into your paper and compile it with this DOI. The DOI is booked but not finally registered. This will be done in the next steps
  4. Now, upload the pdf of your preprint
    • upload pdf
    • check filename (should be meaningful)
    • Set embargo date if neccessary
    • next
  5. Verfiy your submission and accept the license of TORE
  6. Your submission is nearly done. TUHH Library will check your submission. Either they accept it or ask you to change things. You will be emailed. Your entry is so to say, peer review on metadata level
  7. For now you are done. Further version have to be uploaded when the paper got accepted and you can upload the final author version to TORE. Please make sure that you reference the publisher DOI and add the correct credits to the paper.

Publish your software files related to your paper publication

You want to publish files like your source code, your data or videos in a save manner and cite them using a DOI?

The code you publish should be able to reproduce all figures you show in your publication by running one or multiple files which are than related to your figure. If your code uses special software or libraries to run, you should note them down in a dependancies and software section in a readme file of the repository. You should not include these files to your repository. Installation steps should be explained.

Than this is one way to go:

  1. Create a repository for your publication in our gitlab instance: TUHH – Gitlab. In general you create
    • a repository for your paper (See Paper Section)
    • a repository for your software code in https://collaborating.tuhh.de/ICS/ics-private/phd-students/papers (private repo) by using the following scheme: Year-code-conference-FirstSixWordsOfTitleOfYourPublication (e.g. 2021-code-ECC-A-Gradient-Descent-Method-for-Finite) while the paper is in the corresponding Year-paper-conference-TitleOfYourContribution repository.
  2. Upload your code by using git (You can use this repo already when starting to work on an idea: Repositories can be renamed and moved in the gitlab structure). Code should be cleaned up and except for dependancies and libraries selfcontaining. (Be careful on which branch to push, master gets automatically pushed to github, others not)
  3. Add a License file to the repo using templates: GPLv3 (Software) and CC-BY-SA (for all other media) and remove all lines after End of Terms and Conditions around line 625
  4. Add the following header lines to the beginning of each of your files. In references your refere to papers, software or tools you base on to cite them. Make sure that our license in compatible with the build on software/library/code.
```
%------
% Project: Name and Link
% Copyright: 
% License: 
% References:
% Authors:
%------

%---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
% For Paper, 
% "A Gradient Descent Method for Finite Horizon Distributed Control of Discrete Time Systems"
% by Simon Heinke and Herbert Werner
% Copyright (c) Institute of Control Systems, Hamburg University of Technology. All rights reserved.
% Licensed under the GPLv3. See LICENSE in the project root for license information.
% Uses an own implementation of the work of 
% "A. Vamsi and N. Elia, Design of distributed controllers realizable over arbitrary directed networks,
% IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, 2010."
% Author(s): Simon Heinke
%--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
```
  1. You also might want to enter a section in the Readme file on how to cite your work. Therefore you should include bibtex code for citing authors to reference your work in their publication. E.g.:
``` 
@misc{1606.01540,
    Author = {Greg Brockman and Vicki Cheung and Ludwig Pettersson and Jonas Schneider and John Schulman and Jie Tang and Wojciech Zaremba},   Title = {OpenAI Gym},
    Year = {2016},
    Eprint = {arXiv:1606.01540},
}
 ```

Example for Readme.md from Christian Hespe:

Example for a Readme.md file
  1. Create a repository at github.com/TUHH-ICS
    • with the same name as in gitlab
    • Give a short meaningful description
    • Select public
    • Click on create repository
    • Ask Lennart Heeren or Patrick Göttsch to grant you maintainer rights in that particular repository
    • Copy the SSH url from github
  2. Enable mirroring in gitlab
    • Switch to your private gitlab repository
    • Left menu -> Settings -> Repository -> Expand Mirroring repositories
    • Paste your github url in Input the remote repository URL
    • Modify it this way: ssh:// at the beginning and replace the colon after github.com with a slash. It should look like this now: ssh://git@github.com/TUHH-ICS/REPO_NAME
    • Klick on Detect host keys button
    • Select (although it does not seam to be clickable) in authentification method SSH Public Key
    • And select Mirror only protected branches. By default only the master branch will be pushed as it is.
    • Click on mirror repository to setup the mirror.
    • Now you have to click on the Copy ssh public key
Copy the ssh public key via mousclick on the copy item
  • After a click on the key…
    • go back to GitHub;, click on Settings > Deploy Keys > Add deploy key
    • Give it some title, paste the copied key in the key field and check Allow write access abd than click on Add key
    • Now you can trigger the mirroring by pushing or merging into the master branch in gitlab or manually in the gitlab repo mirroring settings page
  1. Uploading to Zenodo
    • Login to Zenodo using ** Log in with this credentials **
      • user: ics@tuhh.de
      • passwd: JJ^Q?…
    • Click on setting->github (1),
    • Click on Sync now button (2),
    • and enable the repository (3, located at the end of the list),
    • Then we go back to github and create a new release (4):
  • give a version tag like v1.0
  • give a meaningful title
  • and some description (will also be published by zenodo)
  • click on Publish Release
Click on „Publish release“ after assigning a tag, a title and a description

This automatically generates a zip of the code and this zip gets uploaded to zenodo, also automatically.

  1. Creating a DOI/Publishing
  • Back in Zenodo click on upload at the top of the page
Upload-Button
  • Here you find your software code already published
Published software code
  • Since not all metadata is available on github, you have to edit your entry
    • Click on the title opens the entry and shows a view as readers would see it.
    • You can click on edit to add or change metadata. The next view is organised in multiple sections:
      • Files: Here you can upload a new version manually. But normmaly you would choose a github release as the way to go.
      • Communities: Please select Hamburg University of Technology to reference this contribution to TUHH
      • Upload Type: Should already be Software
      • Basic Information:
        • Adjust the Title because the github repo name has been used. E.g.: Code for paper: Name of my marvellous paper
        • Authors: Clean up authors list; Lastname, Firstname – Hamburg University of Technology – Institute of Control Systems – ORCID
        • Add Prof Werner to this list: Werner, Herbert Hamburg University of Technology – Institute of Control Systems – 0000-0003-3456-5539
        • Add a meaningful Description
        • Version tag got automatically set
        • Language: Choose English
        • Give similar Keyword as you choose for your paper
      • License: All should be okay. The License is provided in the repository. Zenodo so far does not support GPLv3.
      • Funding: Select nothing
      • Save the changes. And when you think they can be published, hit the publish button.
  1. Cite code
    • use Zenodo Bibtex generator to get a bibtex entry of your code for your latex literature file – Export section (bottom right)
BibTeX code export via Zenodo

Put a DOI patch into the readme -> Use latest version DOI by clicking on the DOI entry (1) and copying the markdown code (2) from the window. You can add a badge to your gitlab repo as well, either in the readme (2) or by adding a batch using (3a) and (3b)

Zendodo DOI Badge

You might want to change the DOI to the DOI for the latest version:

Adjust the DOI
  1. Updating
    • Create new release on github
    • update Description on zenodo
CC BY 4.0
Weiternutzung als OER ausdrücklich erlaubt: Dieses Werk und dessen Inhalte sind – sofern nicht anders angegeben – lizenziert unter CC BY 4.0. Nennung gemäß TULLU-Regel bitte wie folgt: Open Access Publishing at TUHH: Exemplary Step-by-step guide for a toolchain with TORE, GitLab, Sherpa Romeo and Zenodo von Patrick Göttsch, Christian Hespe, Adwait Datar, Simon Heinke und Lennart Heeren Lizenz: CC BY 4.0. Eine ggf. aktualisierte Version des Workflows kann über dieses GitLab-Repositorium abgerufen werden.

Monatsnotiz Juni/ Juli 2021 – Semesterende, Barcamps und die neue Single Source Publishing Community

Die Zeit fliegt. Ein kurzer Rückblick auf die Monate Juni und Juli 2021. Unser Seminar „Wissenschaftliches Arbeiten“ (Sommersemester) ist nach dem Start im April mit Posterpräsentationen der Studierenden im Juli zu Ende gegangen und bei Veranstaltungen wie dem Edunauten-Barcamp oder dem stARTcamp meets HOOU (Motto „Herausforderung angenommen? Wie Wissenschaft und Kultur soziale Verantwortung und Digitalisierung leben“) ging es vor allem um Digitalisierung, Nachhaltigkeit, Teilhabe und offenes Lernen und Lehren. Das erste Mal selbst teilgenommen habe ich am bundesweiten Digitaltag sowie dem Recherchebarcamp („Recherche im 21. Jahrhundert“). Hinweisen möchte ich in dieser Monatsnotiz auch auf eine neue Community zum Thema Single Source Publishing.


Wissenschaftliches Arbeiten

Am 08.07.2021 fand der letzte Termin unseres unseres Bachelorseminars „Wissenschaftliches Arbeiten“ im Sommersemester 2021 statt. Das Seminar war mit 60 Studierenden voll belegt und erfreulicherweise haben fast alle Teilnehmenden unser NTA-Angebot (Nichttechnisches Lehrangebot) erfolgreich abgeschlossen. Beendet haben wir das Semester mit Posterpräsentationen zu ganz unterschiedlichen Themen (z. B. 3D-Druck im Heimbereich, Wellenleiter für Hifi-Hochtöner, Verbesserungsmöglichkeiten der Arbeitssicherheit in Tischlereien, Elektromobilität und artgerechte Ausbildung und Haltung von Pferden), die die Studierenden als selbst gewähltes Thema im Rahmen des Semesters bearbeitet haben. Gefreut habe ich mich auch über das positive Feedback und Anregungen für zukünftige Veranstaltungen. Zu einigen Themen wie Kollaborationstools, der Ideenfindung für wissenschaftliche Arbeiten, Recherche, Möglichkeiten zur Erstellung von Notizen oder den Umgang mit Zeit habe ich parallel oder im Nachgang offen verfügbare Kurzzusammenfassungen erstellt, die vor allem auch vom Austausch im Rahmen des jeweiligen Termins geprägt sind.

Für Themen wie Open Science, überwiegend praxisorientierte Einblicke in die Erstellung von Notizen und den Einstieg in die Literaturverwaltung haben wir bei Interesse hier auf tub.torials auch einige Beiträge im Angebot:

Interessant könnte im Zusammenhang mit dem wissenschaftlichen Arbeiten auch die Sammlung Mehr als 77 Tipps zum wissenschaftlichen Arbeiten sein, die Axel Dürkop, Thomas Hapke und Tobias Zeumer zusammen mit mir am 27.04.2021 Open Access veröffentlicht haben.


Veranstaltungen

Auch in den Monaten Juni und Juli gab es trotz Anbruch der Urlaubszeit viele Veranstaltungsangebote. Von einigen möchte ich an dieser Stelle kurz berichten. Die Informationen zu den einzelnen Veranstaltungen lassen sich über einen Klick auf das jeweils an der rechten Seite angeordnete Plus-Symbol einblenden.

Asynchrones Edunauten-Barcamp (03.06. bis 13.06.)

Vom 03. bis 13. Juni 2021 fand das asynchrone Barcamp der Edunauten statt. Im Gegensatz zu vielen gängigen Onlineformaten gab es bei dieser Veranstaltung keine Videokonferenzen, sondern strukturierten, zeitversetzten Online-Austausch. Einen Überblick über die Sessions und die Sessionvorstellungen – zum Teil über Audio- und Videoformate – gibt es auf dieser Seite.

Mich hat hier vor allem die Session Unterrichten mit nachhaltiger und freier Software interessiert. Im dazugehörigen Board und den Kommentaren ist eine schöne Toolsammlung zusammengekommen und auch interessante Fragen, beispielsweise zum Spannungsfeld proprietäre vs. offenen Software, wurden aufgeworfen. Generell lohnt sich meiner Meinung nach aber auf jeden Fall das Nachstöbern im Sessionangebot. So habe ich kürzlich erst bei Blogkultur Podcast – Gastbeiträge in den Kommentaren eine tolle Zusammenstellung an Bildungsblogs gefunden.

Sehr hilfreich für alle, die vielleicht ebenfalls weiter mit asynchronen Veranstaltungen experimentieren wollen: Es gibt einen Rückblick auf Konzept, Umsetzung und Erfahrungen mit dem asynchronen Online-Barcamp-Format von Blanche Fabri, Kristin Narr, Jöran Muuß-Merholz und Nele Hirsch, der unter CC BY 4.0 veröffentlicht wurde.

stARTcamp meets HOOU (11.06.)

Das stARTcamp meets HOOU fand dieses Jahr am 11.06.2021 unter dem Motto „Herausforderung angenommen? Wie Wissenschaft und Kultur soziale Verantwortung und Digitalisierung leben“ statt. Und wie so oft bei diesen Veranstaltungen: es gibt haufenweise tolle Beiträge und Themen. Nicht teilnehmen konnte ich leider an der Learning-Circles-Session. Diese Lernkreise verknüpfen individuelles, selbstorganisiertes Lernen mit der Möglichkeit in Lernpartnerschaften Lernprozesse abzusichern und zu erweitern. Glücklicherweise haben die Teilgebenden dazu auf den Seiten der HOOU gebloggt, so dass man einen guten Einblick in die gesammelten Erfahrungen nachlesen kann.

Spannend fand ich auch die Session „Von Analog bis Digital – Die Entwicklung eines Lernangebots zum Thema Küstenschutz in einem sich wandelnden Klima“, bei der Teilnehmende sich unter anderem auch zu Gefahren durch ein mögliches Überlaufen der Elbe, Binnenhochwasser und Starkregen austauschen konnten. Mehr zu diesem HOOU-Projekt gibt es auf den Seiten des Projektes AKWAS 4.0.

Ich selbst habe die Session 14 Monate online lehren und lernen – Dos and Don’ts zur Förderung eines aktiven Austauschs angeboten. In dieser ging es um individuelle Erfahrungen, wie ein aktives Miteinander im Rahmen digitaler Veranstaltungen gefördert werden kann. Zusammengefasst habe ich die Session im Beitrag Die Sache mit den Digitalveranstaltungen – Nachklapp zu „14 Monate online lehren und lernen – Dos and Don’ts zur Förderung eines aktiven Austauschs.

Spannend fand ich auch die Session „Von Analog bis Digital – Die Entwicklung eines Lernangebots zum Thema Küstenschutz in einem sich wandelnden Klima“, bei der Teilnehmende sich unter anderem auch zu Gefahren durch ein mögliches Überlaufen der Elbe, Binnenhochwasser und Starkregen austauschen konnten. Mehr zu diesem HOOU-Projekt gibt es auf den Seiten des Projektes AKWAS 4.0.

Ich selbst habe die Session 14 Monate online lehren und lernen – Dos and Don’ts zur Förderung eines aktiven Austauschs angeboten. In dieser ging es um individuelle Erfahrungen, wie ein aktives Miteinander im Rahmen digitaler Veranstaltungen gefördert werden kann. Zusammengefasst habe ich die Session im Beitrag Die Sache mit den Digitalveranstaltungen – Nachklapp zu „14 Monate online lehren und lernen – Dos and Don’ts zur Förderung eines aktiven Austauschs.

Digitaltag 2021 (18.06.)

Die Universitätsbibliothek der TU hat am 18.06.2021 am bundesweiten Digitaltag teilgenommen. Axel Dürkop und ich haben dafür den Kurzworkshop Zusammen schreibst du weniger allein! – Offene digitale Werkzeuge an der TU Hamburg eingeladen. Hier wollten wir einen Einblick in unsere Buchproduktion mit freier Software geben. Trotz Temperaturen, die uns alle wohl zumindest gedanklich auf die Suche nach dem erfrischendsten Badesee in nächster Nähe geschickt haben, konnte die Veranstaltung erfreulicherweise stattfinden. Eine kleine Zusammenfassung dazu haben wir hier verbloggt. Vor allem die Herausforderung Anschluss an Arbeits- und Schreibgruppen in Zeiten einer Pandemie zu finden und die Entwicklung von Serviceangeboten von Hochschulen und ihren Bibliotheken spielen dabei eine Rolle.

Barcamp „Recherche im 21. Jahrhundert“ (25.06 und 26.06.)

Am 25.06 und 26.06.2021 lud das Institut für Geschichte der Universität Hildesheim zum ersten Recherchebarcamp ein. Wie der Titel schon verrät, ging es um das Thema Recherche. Wer also Interesse am Suchen und Finden von Informationen hat, war hier absolut richtig. Besonders gut hat mir neben der sehr herzlichen Atmosphäre des – von Studierenden mitorganisierten – Barcamps die Transparenz der Veranstaltung gefallen. Für Neueinsteiger wurde das Konzept Barcamp mit einem gut verständlichen 10-Regeln-Poster erklärt. Der Sessionplan wurde mit Taskcards (eine Art digitale Pinnwand die an Padlet erinnert) umgesetzt, was ebenfalls gut verständlich im Vorfeld in Text- und Videoform für alle Interessierten erklärt wurde.

Neben Sessions zu Themen wie „Was brauchen Promovierende?“, „Wohin mit meinen Daten?“, „Suchstrategien entwickeln“ und „Digitale Bildersuche“ gab es einen spannenden Lightning-Talk von Johanna Wild vom Recherchenetzwerk Bellincat („Wenn eine Internetverbindung genügt, um Missstände aufzudecken: Ein Einblick in Bellingcat’s Open Source-Recherchen“). Bis zu diesem Zeitpunkt habe ich den Begriff Open Source-Recherche noch nie gehört. Zu verstehen ist darunter, das die Recherche überwiegend durch öffentlich zugängliche Informationen aus dem Internet aufbaut. Spannende Einblicke, die auch als Video zur Verfügung stehen! Ganz großartig – und irgendwie naheliegend bei einem Recherchebarcamp – war auch das Recherchebattle Wikipedia. Die Regeln:

  1. Man muss nur durch Anklicken von Hyperlinks vom Startartikel zum Zielartikel kommen.
  2. Man darf NICHT außerhalb von Wikipedia suchen.
  3. Man darf NICHT das Suchfeld „Wikipedia durchsuchen“ nutzen.
  4. Man darf die Browser-Funktion „Seite durchsuchen“ nutzen (Strg+F).
  5. Am Ziel angekommen gilt es (bei Onlineveranstaltungen) schnell im Chat Bescheid zu geben („Da!“).

Das Spiel wird dann gestoppt und gemeinsam wird der Suchverlauf betrachtet. Spannend, unterhaltsam und auch eine gute Möglichkeit um zu verdeutlichen, dass es diesen einen Königsweg beim Finden, wie mein ehemaliger Kollege Thomas Hapke oft zu sagen pflegte, nicht gibt und vor allem die eigenen digitalen Kompetenzen stetig „gepflegt“ werden sollten. Das Konzept hat mir so gut gefallen, dass ich es zukünftig gerne auch in eigenen Veranstaltungen an geeigneter Stelle einbinden möchte.

Ich selbst habe beim Barcamp die Session „Erstellen von OER – Wer, wie, was…?“ angeboten. Dazu plane ich (hoffentlich!) in den kommenden Wochen im Nachgang einen kurzen Beitrag zusammenzustellen. Einiges zu dieser und weiteren Sessions gibt es derzeit auch noch in den Sessiondokumentationen zu sehen.

DaLiCo-Workshop (06.07.)

Am 06. Juli habe ich an einem DaLiCo-Workshop (Data Literacy in Context) teilgenommen. Die Veranstaltung wurde unter dem Titel „Integrating digital competencies into the research toolbox“ von der HAW Hamburg und der University of Debrecen durchgeführt, wobei zwei Hauptthemen im Fokus standen:

  • Kompetenzen innerhalb von Forschungsdatenmanagement-Prozessen stärken,
  • Kennenlernen von Bestandteilen eines Train-the-Trainer (TtT)-Workshops, der sich derzeit zum Thema „Effektiver Wissenstransfer in der Forschungsunterstützung“ im Aufbau befindet.

Insgesamt haben zirka 20 Teilnehmer:innen aus Ungarn und Deutschland (u. a. von der HAW Hamburg, Uni Marburg, Hochschule RheinMain sowie der ZBW) aus den Bereichen Information und Bibliothek teilgenommen. Gefreut habe ich mich – neben den Inhalten an sich (unter anderem ging es um Data Literacy und FAIR Data) – vor allem über zwei weitere Punkte:

  • Ich denke sehr gerne (und oft) an mein Studium an der HAW zurück (für Interessierte: die gerade ausgelaufene Ausschreibung des Studiengangs Bibliotheks- und Informationsmanagement, aber das nächste Semester steht ja auch bald vor der Tür!). Zum einen natürlich, weil man viele tolle Menschen kennengelernt hat. Zum anderen empfand ich aber vor allem das Miteinander zwischen Studierenden und Dozierenden stark. Gefühlt standen die Türen bei Fragen und dem einen oder anderen benötigten Stups in die richtige Richtung immer offen. Davon zehre ich heute noch und so war es schön mit Frau Gläser eine meiner ehemaligen Dozentinnen nach Jahren wiederzusehen (auch wenn kaum Zeit für Smalltalk war 🙂 ).
  • Internationaler Austausch ist immer spannend. Besonders habe ich mich auf einen Einblick in digitale Tools, die Kolleg:innen (gerade international) so im Einsatz haben, gefreut. Hier nehme ich oft Anregungen oder zumindest Motivation für eigene Veranstaltungen mit, etwas Neues auszuprobieren. Ausgetauscht haben wir uns zu den unterschiedlichen Anwendungen in einer Art Bingo:
Screenshot Toolbingo (nicht unter freier Lizenz)

Neu für mich war das Google Jamboard, ein digitales Whiteboard, bei dem die Nutzung selbst nach kurzer Zeit denkbar einfach ist. Genutzt haben wir Jamboard im Rahmen des Workshops in Breakout-Sessions, um Gruppenergebnisse festzuhalten und zu präsentieren.


Single Source Publishing Community

Addressing #OpenScience advocates, developers, authors and editors we offer a place to discuss, show and tell.

Axel Dürkop

Am 02.07.2021 wurde die Single Source Publishing Community ins Leben gerufen. Single Source Publishing bedeutet kurz und knapp: aus einer einzelnen Quelle können weitere digitale Formate generiert werden. Haben wir also eine Datei im Markdownformat, lassen sich ohne großen Aufwand weitere Ausgabeformate wie PDF oder HTML produzieren. Die neu gegründete Community soll allen Interessierten aus Forschung, Verlagswesen und Softwareentwicklung einen Ort bieten, an dem gemeinsam zugunsten von Open Access und Open Science ein Austausch stattfinden kann. Weitere Informationen zur neuen Singe Source Publishing Community gibt es in einem Beitrag auf GenR und diesem Eröffnungstweet. Aktuelles kann zukünftig auch auf Twitter über das Hashtag #SiSoPub verfolgt werden. Schaut doch mal rein, wenn ihr am Community-Gedanken oder dem Raum zum Ausprobieren und Austausch rund um Single Source Publishing Interesse habt, wir würden uns freuen!


Ausblick

Festhalten möchte ich an dieser Stelle noch ein „Learning“ für mich, was das Schreiben von Monatsnotizen betrifft: wenn ein paar freie Tage den Arbeitsrhythmus „unterbrechen“ unbedingt vorbereitend ein paar kleine Notizen und Stichworte festhalten. Nach dem Urlaub fiel es mir dann doch etwas schwer wieder reinzukommen. Wie handhabt ihr das bei regelmäßigen Blogformaten? Macht ihr euch eine kleine Liste mit Themen über den Monat verteilt, die ihr dann später in einen Text umsetzt oder entstehen Beiträge wie Monatsnotizen (oder andere Formate) bei euch eher aus dem Bauch heraus beim Schreiben? Teilt eure Kniffe doch gerne in den Kommentaren 🙂 .

CC BY 4.0
Weiternutzung als OER ausdrücklich erlaubt: Dieses Werk und dessen Inhalte sind – sofern nicht anders angegeben – lizenziert unter CC BY 4.0. Nennung gemäß TULLU-Regel bitte wie folgt: Monatsnotiz Juni/ Juli 2021 – Semesterende, Barcamps und die neue Single Source Publishing Community von Florian Hagen, Lizenz: CC BY 4.0. Beitragsbild „Monatsnotiz Juni Juli“ von Florian Hagen (CC0/Public Domain). Der Beitrag und dazugehörige Materialien stehen auch im Markdownformat und als PDF zum Download zur Verfügung.
1 2