#OAWeek2020 TORE – a service for you

The research information system TUHH Open Research (TORE) – a Service for you.
Update: tub.talk slides TORE – ein Service für Sie

Research Information System and Repository

TUHH Open Research (TORE) is a combined repository and research information system that provides a service for the scientists of the TUHH.

In TORE with its repository function, full texts of publications can be stored. They receive a DOI and thus become citable. Preprints and doctoral theses are entered as first publications, publications with accepted manuscripts and Open Access with the publisher PDF can also be entered in TORE. In TORE you can also publish your research data with a DOI.

As the research information system of the TUHH, TORE has been mapping the institutes and researchers, publications, third-party funded projects and collaborations of the institutes since 2019. Project data is transferred from the Third-Party Funding Department into TORE and can be edited and activated by project leaders and FIS representatives of the institutes. The library, as the operator of TORE, enters recent TUHH publications for the scientists, which are provided by Scopus. Missing publications can be entered by yourself: e.g. scientific articles, conference contributions, book contributions and books, doctoral theses as well as posters.

TORE is accessible wordwide at tore.tuhh.de without registration. Continue reading

#OAWeek2020 Single-Source-Publishing with Swapfire and OJS

The project Modern Publishing – part of the Hamburg Open Science (HOS) program – combines the many years of experience of the Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH) and the Hamburg State and University Library (SUB). Both institutions started their collaboration in 2019 to develop a process chain for Single-Source-Publishing based on open source solutions such as GitLab and Open Journal Systems. In addition to aspects of collaboration and participation, the focus is also on automatisms for generating different formats of a publication.

First architectural design (2019)

At the Open Access Days 2019 (OA Days), the first draft of the sociotechnical system and its components of the tool chain – Markdown, pandoc-scholar, GitLab, Docker, Hypothes.is and OJS – were presented during the poster session::

OATage2019

Ill.: Poster for the OA-Days 2019 (Source: https://zenodo.org/record/3267474#.X4m5YC-201I).

 

The writing and publishing process is divided into three phases: the writing, the pre-submission and the submission stage (see Dürkop / Hagen 2019). The writing stage includes the writing process of one or more authors, which leads to a first draft of the text. The pre-submission stage is the phase before the submission, in which different tools are used to generate different formats. Collaborative feedback processes allow a quality control of the contribution before it is transferred to the target system in the desired or required formats as part of the submission stage – in case of our project OJS.

As part of the tool marketplace at the OA Days 2019, interested parties were able to gain further insights. For the project team, the direct exchange with professional colleagues was particularly valuable. This way the process chain and its flexibility could be developed further with different perspectives in mind.

Architectural draft (2020)

The result of the continuing work is Single-Source-Publishing with Swapfire and OJS, which will also be presented as part of our Open-Access-Week workshop (workshop registration) by Tim Boxhammer (SUB HH), Axel Dürkop (tub.), Florian Hagen (tub.), Albert Krewinkel ( tub.) and Isabella Meinecke (SUB HH) today from 2:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.:

Prozesskette SWAPFIRE

Ill.: Single-Source-Publishing with Swapfire and OJS (Source: https://doi.org/10.15480/882.2902).

 

The representation – in the form of a vortex or a kind of snail – shows a workflow of the project for Single-Source-Publishing of a journal publication. Markdown texts are converted into PDF and HTML files with the help of static site generators and converters – depending on which target formats (e.g. journal articles, but also teaching-learning scripts or websites) are needed.

The process chain is divided into seven steps:

  • 1. Authors submit article texts, metadata and references in OJS.
  • 2. Following an assessment, the submitted document – if it is available as a DOCX file, for example – is converted into a Markdown file with Pandoc.
  • 3. After the conversion process has been completed, the text corpus must be checked and edited manually.
  • 4. As part of step 4, the references are prepared for the use of the submitted BibLaTeX file.
  • 5. With the help of Netlify CMS the metadata is recorded.
  • 6. Formats such as HTML or PDF are continuously produced with GitLab (universal content management system), Docker (container virtualization) and pandoc-scholar (format conversion).
  • 7. The final files are finally uploaded to OJS and published.

 

Practical application and workshop

In practice, the different possibilities of the process chain were tested with specialist colleagues inside at the TUHH and beyond. Most recently, the freely available and peer-reviewed scientific journal kommunikation@gesellschaft – which has carried out research regarding information and communication technologies for 20 years – was relaunched according to Open Access and Open Science standards using the method shown above.

The project team is looking forward to the workshop and is always open to questions and suggestions.

 

Further information on the Modern Publishing project:
https://oa-pub.hos.tuhh.de/en/

 


More about the Open Access Week 2020:

Hamburg Open Science Award 2020

The project “designing the digital cultural change” within the cross-university program Hamburg Open Science is announcing the

Hamburg Open Science Award 2020

The Hamburg Open Science Award will be awarded in 2020 for the first time, with each prize endowed with €5,000. Up to 5 prizes will be awarded. Submit your application by 16th October 2020. The awards will be announced in November 2020.

Openness is a central idea in the digitalization of science, and Open Science is the key to more interdisciplinary and international cooperation, linkages, transparency, credibility, and efficiency in science and scholarship. It also offers a range of potential opportunities for more participation, innovation, and knowledge transfer in the economy and society as a whole. The criteria for an application can be found at

 

The Program Hamburg Open Science supports researchers from Hamburg-based publicly funded universities in making their work open source and has therefore announced the first-ever Hamburg Open Science Award. The prize honors researchers who are particularly active in promoting openness in academia.

#OAWeek2019 Tips for Open Science in Hamburg

In the winter semester 2019/20 the project “Hamburg Open Science” (HOS) will host the lecture series “Openness in Science” at the University of Hamburg (mondays, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., University main building, lecture hall C).

Lectures (in German!):

Plakat Ringvorlesung Offenheit in der WissenschaftThe lectures cover the entire spectrum of Open Science and Open Education:

  • Is openness a basic value or ideology?
  • Why and how is Open Access published?
  • What do Open Educational Resources (OER) mean for digitisation in education
  • How can research data be managed in practice?
  • What significance do copyright and data protection have for Open Science and Open Education?
  • Why is data literacy becoming increasingly important?
  • How do citizens create knowledge with Citizen Science?

Open Up!

Open Up exhibition LeafletsAs part of its 100th anniversary the ZBW – Leibniz-Informationszentrum Wirtschaft (ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for the Economy) is showing that Open Science can also be exhibited. You can visit the exhibition “Open Up! How digitisation is changing science” in Hamburg until shortly before Christmas.

The exhibition consists of the thematic displays “Digital connectivity”, “New types of publication” and “Finding Literature”. It tries to make the black box “Science”, i.e. the question “How does science actually work”, more transparent to the general public. In the end this is the core of Open Science, as Guido Scherp – Head of the Open Science Transfer Department at the ZBW – also writes in the short booklet accompanying the exhibition:

Basically, Open Science is about improving the trustworthiness and the quality of research in a digitally linked age. The most important instrument for this is openness, resp. transparency.

The accompanying booklet, which is available in German and in English, provides a brief and concise overview of Open Science.

#OAWeek2019 at TUHH – Programme

Open Access Week 2019 at Hamburg

As every year in October, the International Open Access Week, this time from October 21st until October 27th 2019, will provide a worldwide forum and platform for events and activities for open access to scientific information.

The Hamburg University of Technology TU Hamburg participates as always. From October 21st to October 25th, a varied programme awaits you at the TUHH. This time the focus lies on the handling of data. Impulse lectures and an open workshop will cover this topic. The opening will take place through a poster walk in the rotunda of the University Library.

Our progamme at TUHH

-> Flyer with programme
Continue reading

#OAWeek2018 Hamburg Open Science at TUHH

Open Science TUHH requires close cooperation between research and infrastructure. On 6 December 2017, the Hamburg Parliament adopted the „Hamburg Open Science (HOS)“ programme. The aim is to make the research results of publicly funded research in Hamburg freely accessible and easy to discover.

At the TU Hamburg, the preliminary planning for Hamburg Open Science was carried out in close coordination between the Vice President Research, Prof. Dr. Timm-Giel, the library, the computer center and the presidential research department. The TU accepted the challenge that Open also stands for solutions based on Open Source. The library is involved in the following projects in 2018: Continue reading

DOIs for Publications on tub.dok

Often asked for; now it’s time: From now on, the DOI for your document will be displayed on tub.dok before you upload a publication.

This allows you to add the DOI to your PDF for better identification of printouts or saved copies of the file or to insert a quotation recommendation.

Persistent Identifiers in tub.dok

By the way, tub.dok supports different persistent identifier schemes: DOI (Digital Object Identifier), Handle and URN (Uniform Resource Name). Persistent identifiers are used to ensure that a publication can be referenced unambiguously and permanently. Of these, the DOI is the best known and therefore the most important one for you.

The named persistent identifiers are initially marked, but have not yet been registered. Therefore, they cannot yet be resolved. They will be registered after completion of your publication, if the publication is activated by us. We will let you know by e-mail. Please be patient until then. :-)

tub.dok is Open Source

The extension of the software DSpace-CRIS, which we use as the basis of our open access repository, was realized by The Library Code and is available to the entire DSpace community via a branch on github for subsequent use.

Join us on Hamburg Open Science #Jobs

Update 21.11.17: D-17-200 and D-17-194 contracts until 31.12.2020. Applications until 5.12.17

Hamburg wants Open Science! And we want competent people who work with us on this for the TU Hamburg. Initially for 12 months, but hopefully two more years afterwards.

Deadline for applications is 29.11.2017

With the Hamburg Open Science (HOS) programme, Hamburg is implementing a strategy for the expansion of Open Access and Open Science that has been developed across universities. The University of Hamburg (UHH), the Technical University of Hamburg (TUHH), the Hamburg University of Applied Sciences (HAW) and many other universities are involved. From 2018 onwards, implementation will be carried out jointly in the institutions within the framework of the following four programme lines: Open Access publications, research data management, research information systems and the design of digital cultural change.

The TUHH Open Science (TOS) project group is being set up at the TUHH for research data management and research information system. This is also where the HOS research data management program line is managed.

The targets for 2018 are:

  • Conception and implementation of a prototype for a research information system based on the open source software DSpace-CRIS.
  • Conception and implementation of a prototype for an institutional research data repository also based on the open source software DSpace-CRIS.

We are looking for four new research assistants with know-how and a desire for university, open science and the beautiful city of Hamburg with the following focal points:

  1. Teamleitung und Projektsteuerung mit Schwerpunkt Forschungsinformationssystem E14 TV-L
    Stellenausschreibung D-17-200
  2. Konzeption und Aufbau des Forschungsdatenrepositories E13 TV-L
    Stellenausschreibung D-17-199
  3. Konzeption und Aufbau Forschungsdateninformationssystem und Forschungsdatenrepository E13 TV-L
    Stellenausschreibung D-17-198
  4. IT-Konzept, Aufbau und Administration (Rechenzentrum) E13 TV-L
    Stellenausschreibung D-17-194

Open Science - TU Hamburg

Information on Hamburg Open Science

  • Forschungsergebnisse für alle zugänglich machen: Senat beschließt das Programm Hamburg Open Science.
  • Antrag Senat Drucksache 21/10485 26.09.2017

Fair Research Data

Data Sharing and Management Snafu in 3 Short Acts. NYU Health Sciences Library

TUHH is starting plan to set up its own institutional repository for research data. A topic that will accompany us – alongside all technology and workflows – is to make all data FAIR – Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable.

FAIR Data Principles

One of the grand challenges of data-intensive science is to facilitate knowledge discovery by assisting humans and machines in their discovery of, access to, integration and analysis of, task-appropriate scientific data and their associated algorithms and workflows. A FAIR Data Publishing Group of FORCE11 has been discussing FAIR – a set of guiding principles to make data Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Re-usable.

To be Findable:

F1. (meta)data are assigned a globally unique and eternally persistent identifier.
F2. data are described with rich metadata.
F3. (meta)data are registered or indexed in a searchable resource.
F4. metadata specify the data identifier.

To be Accessible:

A1  (meta)data are retrievable by their identifier using a standardized communications protocol.
A1.1 the protocol is open, free, and universally implementable.
A1.2 the protocol allows for an authentication and authorization procedure, where necessary.
A2 metadata are accessible, even when the data are no longer available.

To be Interoperable:

I1. (meta)data use a formal, accessible, shared, and broadly applicable language for knowledge representation.
I2. (meta)data use vocabularies that follow FAIR principles.
I3. (meta)data include qualified references to other (meta)data.

To be Re-usable:

R1. meta(data) have a plurality of accurate and relevant attributes.
R1.1. (meta)data are released with a clear and accessible data usage license.
R1.2. (meta)data are associated with their provenance.
R1.3. (meta)data meet domain-relevant community standards.