Making Your Code Citable

Software development is often an important part of scientific work at TUHH. Many use GitHub to create and share scientific software together. What was missing for a long time was the possibility to clearly reference this software. Only then it can be quoted without problems in scientific publications.

Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) have become the quasi-standard for referencing electronic publications. So what could be more obvious than using DOIs for software? Since 2014 this is possible through the cooperation of GitHub and Zenodo. Zenodo is an open platform for the permanent archiving of research results of almost any kind, operated by CERN and financed by the EU, among others: zenodo.org/features

If you are already active at GitHub, you can connect an existing repository with a Zenodo account. The repository will then be archived on Zenodo and a DOI for the repository is assigned. Further releases are also provided for.

A current example from the Institute of Communication Networks at TUHH:

Sebastian Lindner. (2018, July 16). ComNetsHH/LRE-OMNeT: Publication release (Version v1.0.1). Zenodo. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1313054

Interested?

GitHub describes how it works in just under 10 minutes reading time: Making Your Code Citable
Making Your Code Citable · GitHub Guides

And two more tips about Zenodo:

  1. Use the TUHH-Community on Zenodo for the assignment to the TU: https://zenodo.org/communities/tuhh/ Assignment is also possible at a later date.
  2. Add the ORCID iD (Give credit where credit is due) to the authors, if necessary.

 

p.s. It should not go unmentioned: There is also an alternative repository connection to figshare:
DOI-Button

The right journal for my article – ThinkCheckSubmit

Think Check Submit

Journals are a huge and sometimes confusing offer. How do I make sure I make the right choice for my purpose? In which Open Access journals can the publication be funded by the TUHH DFG-Publishing Fund?

On Monday, July 16, 2018, from 1:15 p.m. to 1:45 p.m., the library in room 0.004 behind the information in the context of tub.talks offers the opportunity for personal exchange, to which the tub. cordially invites.

Where can I find reputable journal titles or publishers?

What should I pay particular attention by selecting a journal?

The Think Check Submit page offers a checklist, some of which are questions:

Do you or your colleagues know the journal?

– Have you read articles in the journal in the past?
– Can you easily find the latest articles in the journal?

Can you simply identify and contact the publisher?

– Is the publisher’s name clearly indicated on the journal’s homepage?
– Can you contact the publisher by phone, e-mail or post?

Does the journal provide clear information on its peer review process?

Are the articles indexed in databases that you use yourself? e.g. Web of Science, Scopus?

Is it clear what costs will be incurred?

– Does the journal’s website explain what payments are made for and when they are billed?

Open Access significantly promotes the visibility of research. But Open Access has also become a new business model that attracts dubious providers. These send out a wide range of invitations to the scientific community with initially low rates for the publication of articles for “feeding”. There is no review process, but high item costs later. In other cases the articles are no longer available after a short time or they are not activated despite payment. In addition, these journals, also known as predatory journals or robbery journals, are generally not evaluated in the Web of Science and Scopus databases. It’s unfortunate for anyone who wants to pursue a scientific career. By the way, there are similar mechanisms for congress invitations!

Do you have any questions? Send us an email to openaccess@tuhh.de

 

tub.talks (with coffee) ;-)

photo of a cup of coffee with topics from the Coffeee Talks

Picture made by using a photo of Dave Michuda (on Unsplash)

Coming to the library at noontime for a coffee! In the end of June and in July you are invited to attend our “tub.talks”. After a brief impulse as thematic input, there will be room for joint discussions and a coffee, this is the new format, that we would like to continue with this second series after its launch in March – at that time under the label „Coffee talks“.

The topics include aspects of using information, like publishing, researching or visualising as well as issues of the (new) German intellectual property law.

4 dates in in June and July, each on Monday, 1.15 pm to 1.45 pm in room 0.004, in the large group room behind the information desk:

  • Monday, June 25, 2018
    Transparent research – citation analysis with special databases
    (Impulse and moderation: Thomas Hapke)
  • Monday, July 2, 2018
    The new UrhWissG (german intelectual property law): worth knowing for research
    (Impulse and moderation: Nazime Assly)
  • Monday, July 9, 2018
    Visualisation in academic work
    (Impulse and moderation: Detlev Bieler)
  • Monday, July 16, 2018
    Open Access – the right journal for the next article
    (Impulse and moderation: Inken Feldsien-Sudhaus)
    Update 19.07.2018: Slides | Blog: The right journal for my article – Think Check Submit

Use the opportunities for exchange, to ask questions, to learn from one another and to discuss. Add your own questions and suggestions (also for further topics for additional talks)!

We are happy to meet you!

DOIs for Publications on tub.dok

Often asked for; now it’s time: From now on, the DOI for your document will be displayed on tub.dok before you upload a publication.

This allows you to add the DOI to your PDF for better identification of printouts or saved copies of the file or to insert a quotation recommendation.

Persistent Identifiers in tub.dok

By the way, tub.dok supports different persistent identifier schemes: DOI (Digital Object Identifier), Handle and URN (Uniform Resource Name). Persistent identifiers are used to ensure that a publication can be referenced unambiguously and permanently. Of these, the DOI is the best known and therefore the most important one for you.

The named persistent identifiers are initially marked, but have not yet been registered. Therefore, they cannot yet be resolved. They will be registered after completion of your publication, if the publication is activated by us. We will let you know by e-mail. Please be patient until then. :-)

tub.dok is Open Source

The extension of the software DSpace-CRIS, which we use as the basis of our open access repository, was realized by The Library Code and is available to the entire DSpace community via a branch on github for subsequent use.

Join us on Hamburg Open Science #Jobs

Update 21.11.17: D-17-200 and D-17-194 contracts until 31.12.2020. Applications until 5.12.17

Hamburg wants Open Science! And we want competent people who work with us on this for the TU Hamburg. Initially for 12 months, but hopefully two more years afterwards.

Deadline for applications is 29.11.2017

With the Hamburg Open Science (HOS) programme, Hamburg is implementing a strategy for the expansion of Open Access and Open Science that has been developed across universities. The University of Hamburg (UHH), the Technical University of Hamburg (TUHH), the Hamburg University of Applied Sciences (HAW) and many other universities are involved. From 2018 onwards, implementation will be carried out jointly in the institutions within the framework of the following four programme lines: Open Access publications, research data management, research information systems and the design of digital cultural change.

The TUHH Open Science (TOS) project group is being set up at the TUHH for research data management and research information system. This is also where the HOS research data management program line is managed.

The targets for 2018 are:

  • Conception and implementation of a prototype for a research information system based on the open source software DSpace-CRIS.
  • Conception and implementation of a prototype for an institutional research data repository also based on the open source software DSpace-CRIS.

We are looking for four new research assistants with know-how and a desire for university, open science and the beautiful city of Hamburg with the following focal points:

  1. Teamleitung und Projektsteuerung mit Schwerpunkt Forschungsinformationssystem E14 TV-L
    Stellenausschreibung D-17-200
  2. Konzeption und Aufbau des Forschungsdatenrepositories E13 TV-L
    Stellenausschreibung D-17-199
  3. Konzeption und Aufbau Forschungsdateninformationssystem und Forschungsdatenrepository E13 TV-L
    Stellenausschreibung D-17-198
  4. IT-Konzept, Aufbau und Administration (Rechenzentrum) E13 TV-L
    Stellenausschreibung D-17-194

Open Science - TU Hamburg

Information on Hamburg Open Science

  • Forschungsergebnisse für alle zugänglich machen: Senat beschließt das Programm Hamburg Open Science.
  • Antrag Senat Drucksache 21/10485 26.09.2017

#OAWeek2017 – tub.dok: Open in order to show your Research

tub.dok is the open access repository of the TUHH for freely available publications of members of the TUHH in full text. We make sure that the publications can be permanently stored and found in various services worldwide.

tub.dok LogoWe are very pleased that we were able to extend tub.dok with three important functions during the International Open Access Week 2017: Continue reading

Fair Research Data

Data Sharing and Management Snafu in 3 Short Acts. NYU Health Sciences Library

TUHH is starting plan to set up its own institutional repository for research data. A topic that will accompany us – alongside all technology and workflows – is to make all data FAIR – Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable.

FAIR Data Principles

One of the grand challenges of data-intensive science is to facilitate knowledge discovery by assisting humans and machines in their discovery of, access to, integration and analysis of, task-appropriate scientific data and their associated algorithms and workflows. A FAIR Data Publishing Group of FORCE11 has been discussing FAIR – a set of guiding principles to make data Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Re-usable.

To be Findable:

F1. (meta)data are assigned a globally unique and eternally persistent identifier.
F2. data are described with rich metadata.
F3. (meta)data are registered or indexed in a searchable resource.
F4. metadata specify the data identifier.

To be Accessible:

A1  (meta)data are retrievable by their identifier using a standardized communications protocol.
A1.1 the protocol is open, free, and universally implementable.
A1.2 the protocol allows for an authentication and authorization procedure, where necessary.
A2 metadata are accessible, even when the data are no longer available.

To be Interoperable:

I1. (meta)data use a formal, accessible, shared, and broadly applicable language for knowledge representation.
I2. (meta)data use vocabularies that follow FAIR principles.
I3. (meta)data include qualified references to other (meta)data.

To be Re-usable:

R1. meta(data) have a plurality of accurate and relevant attributes.
R1.1. (meta)data are released with a clear and accessible data usage license.
R1.2. (meta)data are associated with their provenance.
R1.3. (meta)data meet domain-relevant community standards.


Secure digital research data for the future

The TUHH as an university of technology has the mission to develop technology for people. The university TUHH offers research and education at a high academic level. For the future development and competitiveness in the international context, the TUHH must participate in the discussion on Open Access for research results and research data. Open Access can result in a higher quality of scientific results, better visibility and greater discussion within the scientific community and a better international cooperation. Funding sources as DFG and EU already require open access availability of research results. Hamburg has just launched a prestudy for Hamburg Open Archive, the platform for Open Access in Hamburg.

TUHH adopted the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) recommendations to ensure “Good Scientific Practice” and also the DFG “Guidelines for handling research data“. In this context, we would like to collect requirements and needs for research data management at TUHH.  Research data in this survey is defined as raw data (measured data, source code, simulation results, image data, etc.) on which research results and publications are based.

The TUHH survey about Research Data on behalf of the Präsidium of TUHH is based on the already carried out surveys of the Humboldt University (2013) and the Technische Universität Darmstadt (2015). Participation is voluntary and anonymously possible in German and English. The Scientific Staff and the DV-Beauftragte have been invited by mail to participate in the survey. In case we missed anyone interested at TUHH, please send a short mail to the library. Thank you so much!

The survey is online until 8/15/2016.

For questions, please contact the library or the President’s Research Department.

Shibboleth login on tub.dok

Login tub.dokOur Open Access Repository tub.dok is now integrated into the Shibboleth infrastructure of the TUHH. This means that you can use the advantages of a Single Sign On to publish on tub.dok and are not required to login seperately (once you have logged in on the login page of the TUHH computer center).

The former login with your TUHH account is not necessary any more as Shibboleth is utilizing the same login data. Authors, who do not have a TUHH account, but want to publish on tub.dok are still free to create a local tub.dok account to publish with this account.