Making Your Code Citable

Software development is often an important part of scientific work at TUHH. Many use GitHub to create and share scientific software together. What was missing for a long time was the possibility to clearly reference this software. Only then it can be quoted without problems in scientific publications.

Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) have become the quasi-standard for referencing electronic publications. So what could be more obvious than using DOIs for software? Since 2014 this is possible through the cooperation of GitHub and Zenodo. Zenodo is an open platform for the permanent archiving of research results of almost any kind, operated by CERN and financed by the EU, among others: zenodo.org/features

If you are already active at GitHub, you can connect an existing repository with a Zenodo account. The repository will then be archived on Zenodo and a DOI for the repository is assigned. Further releases are also provided for.

A current example from the Institute of Communication Networks at TUHH:

Sebastian Lindner. (2018, July 16). ComNetsHH/LRE-OMNeT: Publication release (Version v1.0.1). Zenodo. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1313054

Interested?

GitHub describes how it works in just under 10 minutes reading time: Making Your Code Citable
Making Your Code Citable · GitHub Guides

And two more tips about Zenodo:

  1. Use the TUHH-Community on Zenodo for the assignment to the TU: https://zenodo.org/communities/tuhh/ Assignment is also possible at a later date.
  2. Add the ORCID iD (Give credit where credit is due) to the authors, if necessary.

 

p.s. It should not go unmentioned: There is also an alternative repository connection to figshare:
DOI-Button

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